Cottonwood Heights, Utah: Our Home, Part 20

Want a good place to see the Salt Lake valley? Check out Cottonwood Heights! Photo credit: utahrealtygroup.com
Want a good place to see the Salt Lake valley? Check out Cottonwood Heights! Photo credit: utahrealtygroup.com

As an outsider, if you wanted proof of the growth coming to Salt Lake City and the surrounding area, you need look no further than the edges of the valley to find where and how much of the Utah economy is thriving. In these areas there are housing developments, corporate offices, and developing infrastructure. Some of this is more visible than others, and none is more obvious than the skyline of Cottonwood Heights, a fast-growing business hub on the eastern side of the valley.

Near the Salt Lake skiing mecca of Solitude, Brighton, Alta, and Snowbird in the Cottonwood Canyons, Cottonwood Heights (named for the abundance of Cottonwood trees in the area) is a gateway to outdoor activities as well as serving as a home for a good portion of the valley. Indeed, the population of the area has grown significantly since the millennium, with the “city between the canyons” being perched between Sandy, Holladay, Midvale, Millcreek, and Murray. Its central-side location pays dividends for access to the rest of the area, with I-215 cutting a corner through it and Utah Transit Authority bus routes slicing through the city streets.

Cottonwood Heights not only has the stunning Wasatch Mountains rising in its vicinity, it also has businesses climbing up and out of its base. Old Mill Business Park features prominently and shows that it’s not just downtown Salt Lake that is home to business players. Dyno Nobel, Extra Space Storage, JetBlue Airways, Instructure, and SanDisk-iO Technologies all have major or primary offices just off the freeway and feature heavily in the local economy. Instructure has software used by universities around the country, SanDisk has created a computer storage empire, and JetBlue offers flights around the country and beyond, including to and from Salt Lake City International Airport, reaching to large markets such as Los Angeles and New York City. Tucked just behind these is a set of great eats, including Market Street Grill and Cafe Trio.

While Cottonwood Heights did not incorporate until 2005, the area has been a location people have called home for a while. The Deseret News constructed a paper mill there in 1883 (the namesake of the aforementioned Old Mill business park is no coincidence); fast forward to the 2000s when Money Magazine put the city on its list of Best Places to Live in the United States. Indeed, Cottonwood Heights has some more established neighborhoods than some of its neighbors, but the homes and their values have retained staying power with their location and design. While the front face of the city from the freeway could easily fit in Silicon Valley (or even the neighbor to the south, Silicon Slopes), Cottonwood has the reputation of staying as a quiet residential city. With only one high school within its borders and much of the businesses confined to the northwestern edge, much the streets stay quiet and safe. It’s been a great place for families to live, and remains so as other cities grow faster and closer together.

Like some of its immediate neighbors, Cottonwood Heights has experienced an economic and industry change in more recent years, going from manufacturing and hard goods to service and technology. One aspect that has not changed, though, is the appeal to the outdoors. Regardless of the season, the nearby canyons beckon to local and visitors to spend time outside hiking and skiing, with breathtaking views and a deep supply of The Greatest Snow on Earth. As regular visitors to all it has to offer, we at VIP Limousine definitely love having Cottonwood Heights as a part of our home.

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